BOOK FUN MAGAZINE - FREE READ

BOOK FUN MAGAZINE IS HERE - CHECK OUT OUR FIRST ISSUE


BOOK FUN MAGAZINE is out. It's FREE -

TAKE A LOOK CLICK on the LINK
www.bookfunmagazine.com



This is the picture on the front page of Book Fun Magazine. It also includes a heartfelt interview with Davis Bunn and a book review of Rare Earth from a man's point of view by Rick Estep.

Kimberely Woodhouse has a great article about a very unusual book club experience with lots of great pictures.

Tiffany Coulter has a great article about starting a family book club and her experiences with that.

Kelly Kelpher has a fun article about food and book clubs you'll want to read and try the recipe for your next book club meeting.

Anyway, this is your magazine. If there is something not in this magazine that you'd like to see let us know. If you have an idea for our Book Fun Magazine contact us. We'd love to hear from you. We can be reached at "Fred" fred@thebookclubnetwork.com

If you are an author with a fun book club experience you'd like to share we'd love to hear from you. We are paying authors for their articles and pictures.

Are you a book club that has a book club experience you enjoyed? We'd love to hear from you too!! Do you have pictures you want to share, recipes, field trips and more. Well contact us at the email address above. We want to put in the magazine things you want to read about!!

Tell your friends About Book Fun Magazine.

Sincerely,

Nora St.Laurent
TBCN Where Book Fun Begins!

CFBA - ALICE WISLER'S STILL LIFE IN SHADOWS REVIEWED

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
Still Life in Shadows
River North; New Edition edition (August 1, 2012)
by
Alice Wisler


ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Alice was born in Osaka, Japan in the sixties. Her parents were Presbyterian career missionaries. As a young child, Alice loved to walk down to the local stationer's store to buy notebooks, pencils and scented erasers. In her room, she created stories. The desire to be a published famous author has never left her. Well, two out of three isn't bad. She's the author of Rain Song, How Sweet It Is, Hatteras Girl and A Wedding Invitation (all published by Bethany House).

Alice went to Eastern Mennonite University after graduating from Canadian Academy, an international high school in Kobe, Japan. She majored in social work and has worked across the U.S. in that field. She taught ESL (English as a Second Language) in Japan and at a refugee camp in the Philippines. She also studied Spanish at a language institute in San Jose, Costa Rica.

She has four children--Rachel, Daniel, Benjamin and Elizabeth. Daniel died on 2/2/97 from cancer treatments at the age of four. Since then, Alice founded Daniel's House Publications in her son's memory. This organization reaches out to others who have also lost a child to death. In 2000 and 2003, Alice compiled recipes and memories of children across the world to publish two memorial cookbooks, Slices of Sunlight and Down the Cereal Aisle.



ABOUT THE BOOK
It's been fifteen years since Gideon Miller ran away from his Amish community in Carlisle, Pennsylvania as a boy of fifteen.  Gideon arrives in the Smoky Mountains town of Twin Branches and settles in at the local auto mechanic's garage. He meets a host of interesting characters -the most recent acquaintances are Kiki, an autistic teen, and her sister Mari. Known as the "Getaway Savior" he helps other Amish boys and girls relocate to life in modern America.

One day the phone rings. On the other end is his brother Moriah calling from Florida. Of course Gideon welcomes his brother to stay with him and offers him a job. But Moriah is caught in a web which ends in his death and forces Gideon to return to the town of his youth, with his brother's body in the back of a hearse and Mari and Kiki at his side. He must face not only the community he ran away from years ago but also his own web of bitterness. Will he be able to give his anger over to God and forgive his father?

If you would like to read the first chapter excerpt of Still Life in Shadows, go HERE.

REVIEW WILL BE POSTED TONIGHT!!

Nora :o)


LAST DAY TO ENTER TWO 10 BOOK DRAWINGS


A HEARTBEAT AWAY by HARRY KRAUS PLUS BONUS GIFT BASKET
ALL ENTRIES MADE AT THE BOOK CLUB NETWORK ON THE AUTHOR PAGE
GIVEAWAY LINK BELOW


ALL ENTRIES MADE ON THE AUTHOR PAGE NOT ON THIS BLOG POST
GIVE AWAY LINK BELOW
http://www.bookfun.org/group/tbcnfeaturedauthors/forum/topics/september-2012-featured-author-ginny-yttrup-10-book-giveaway


LAST DAY TO ENTER 1 Book Drawing for each book Veiled Freedom and Freedom Stand's

by Featured CAN AUTHOR JEANETTE WINDLE

ALL ENTRIES MADE @The Book Club Network http://ning.it/P0MBj8


Loved theses books

Nora St.Laurent
TBCN Where Book Fun Begins!
www.bookfun.org

CFBA - A HEARTBEAT AWAY by HARRY KRAUS REVIEWED

This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
A Heartbeat Away
David C. Cook (September 1, 2012)
by
Harry Kraus

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
A Word from Harry:
I started writing my first novel during my last year of surgery training at UK. I was a chief resident, and started writing Stainless Steal Hearts in a call room at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Lexington. It was a crazy time to write! I had a very demanding schedule, often spending days and nights in the hospital. I had two sons at that time, and I recognized the wisdom in my wife's urging: "Now doesn't seem the right time for this dream."

My experience as a writer is far from typical. Having received my formal training in biology and chemistry and medicine, my only preparation for a writing career was a love for reading. The longest thing I'd written before my first novel was a term paper in undergraduate school. My first novel was accepted by Crossway Books and published in 1994, and it wasn't until after I had FOUR published novels that I even opened a book of instruction about the craft of writing fiction. This is not what I recommend to others! Yes, I was successful, but I was bending the "rules" without knowing it. I had a natural talent for plotting, but I realize my initial success may have stunted my growth as a writer. I'd have made faster progress if I'd have gone to the fiction teachers sooner.

I have three sons: Joel, Evan, and Samuel. Look closely in all of my books and you'll see them there. My lovely wife, Kris, provides the basic composition for all those beautiful, athletic, dedicated women in my novels.

ABOUT THE BOOK
When a brilliant surgeon undergoes a heart transplant, her life transforms as she begins experiencing memories of a murder she never witnessed.

The residents worship her. Nurses step out of her way. Her colleagues respect and sometimes even fear her. But surgeon Tori Taylor never expected to end up on this side of the operating table.

Now she has a new heart. This life that was formerly controlled and predictable is now chaotic. Dr. Taylor had famously protected herself from love or commitment, but her walls are beginning to crumble.

And strangest of all, memories surface that will take her on a journey out of the operating room and into a murder investigation.

Where there once was a heart of stone, there is a heart of flesh. And there is no going back.
If you'd like to read the first chapter excerpt of A Heartbeat Away, go HERE.


REVIEW: I'm so thankful for the review copy of this astounding book! Wow, so many surprises right up until the last page. This story is a page turner and will keep you up late at night engaged with his spell bounding plotlines and will grip your heart with endearing characters I instantly cared for. This book is going on Finding Hope Book Club's voting list for sure! There's so much to talk about!
Harry Kraus w/Finding Hope Book Club
In the back of this book is a note from the author that says, "Getting to Know Harry..."

He says, "The writing part of my life comes at the book ends of days filled with sweat and blood. The sweat is mine; the blood, my patient's. My clinics are filled with people who have long ignored their cancers and have often visited "traditional healers" who only worsened their situations. There is little time during the day to turn my thoughts to the craft of fiction, so that comes when the lights in the clinic are off and the last patient has either been admitted or found a ride up the rutted road toward the highway.......

My greatest passion and motivation is to see christ treasure in the hearts of all people. That may sound like an impossible goad to get a handle on, but I believe it is helpful to understand the target and how my work may or may not fit.

To this end, I believe medicine (and surgery in particular) is a wonderful field of God-sent opportunities: people come to surgeons in crisis. And these crises create a situation where people finally start asking the right questions about eternity. Many of these people would never seek out a pastor; but, by necessity, they find themselves in my office. And there, with permission, we hope to offer compassion, prayer, and the science and art of healing surgery. Here in Kenya.

I practice in a mission-hospital setting, and many of the patients come face-to-face wit the gospel during their hospital stays. It may be a word from a physician, a nurse, the woman who mops the floor, or a chaplain, but my prayer is that everyone has an opportunity to hear the greatest news ever!!....

I hope that a small message of hope, faith, or grace is absorbed. My desire is that Kraus fiction will nudge people close to a life where Jesus is treasured. to that end, I desire my protagonists to be real: people with problems. Not all of my protagonists are Christians; many, like Tori in this book, find faith as a result of the conflicts they face. When I write about a Christian character, it is important to me to show them as real people with real life issues. Christians struggle with doubt, Christians have pain, Christians are tempted, Christians fall, get angry and struggle with materialism and lust. So, if you are reading Kraus fiction, expect a transparent look into real life. You wont' see a rose-pedal-strewn pathway for the Christians in my novels. That's just not reality. ....

I sincerely believe that the world doesn't need more perfect Christians; the world needs transparency! Christians who are willing to say "I haven't got it all together, but I'm holding the hand (actually, I'm engraved on His!) of the One who does."

I appreciate the author sharing this with the reader. It's exactly what he delivers in his new book. I had the opportunity to hear Harry Kraus speak to Finding Hope's book club a few years back. It was amazing to hear about the operating facilities and the conditions in which he practiced medicine. He shared his testimony and how the Lord drew him and his family to Africa. Equally as fascinating was hearing about how he and his family have grown to love this country and it's people.

The story kicks off with the medical drama of a heart transplant surgery for a surgeon named,  Tori, nicknamed "ice princess". She's a horrible patient and hard on the nurses. Then the police drama as Tori gets involved in a murder mystery. She learns about love and peace for her soul in the middle of it all- fun! 

I loved the humor Harry mixes into this story as well, for example. Tori wakes up after having a heart transplant and is reaping what she has sown in bashing the nursing staff at the hospital for years. She says to the Dr. observing how the nurses were treating her.

"Don't, Tori said. "I've not made many friends among the nursing staff. Now I'm paying for it."

"It's still not right." He flipped open his cell phone. "I'll call my team..."

"Ever heard of the golden rule?" 

"Sure", Dr. Marsh said. "I went to Sunday school."

"Good," she said. "I didn't. So you should know better. This is what you get when you don't use it."

Harry Krause speaking @ Finding Hope Book Club 
I especially connected with the authors last statement  in the back of the book which says, "the world needs transparency not more perfect Christians.... I haven't got it all together, but I'm holding the hand of the One who does."  Now, That's the take away from this book. I love how he interweaves the characters struggles with faith and how they deal with the temptations of this life in the middle of all the drama and suspense.

This author brings a honest realism to his stories and a refreshing transparency to his characters that will leave you thinking and feeling for his characters and their situation long after you close the book. They will be forever in your heart and mind. I highly, highly recommend this book.


Nora St.Laurent
The Book Club Network
www.bookfun.org 

JODY HEDLUND INTERVIEW & 10 BOOK GIVEAWAY




ABOUT AUTHOR: Jody Hedlund
is an award-winning author of inspirational historical romances, including the best-selling historical, The Preacher's Bride.

As a busy mama-writer, she has the wonderful privilege of teaching her crew of 5 children at home. In between grading math papers and giving spelling tests, she occasionally does a load of laundry and washes dishes. When she's not busy being a mama, you can find her in front of her laptop. Sometimes her family thinks her fingers are super-glued to the keyboard, but in reality she usually finds her writing time in the wee hours of the morning and then for a couple of hours in the afternoon when done with school. She views writing as God's gift to her--a creative outlet that helps bring fresh energy to her parenting.

She's living testimony that amidst the crazy chaos of running a large family, it's still possible to squeeze in time for writing and fulfill the dream of publication. She chronicles both the joys and difficulties of her journey toward publication on her blog, Author Jody Hedlund:http://jodyhedlund.blogspot.com/
 
 
How did you come up with the idea for Unending Devotion, did you base your main character after anyone special?


During my research for the book, I began reading biographies about people who lived during the lumber era. And as I did, I ran across stories of young women who didn't fit into the glamorized legends and songs.

The stories of many of these women were much darker. They're tales of women who were abused, exploited, and even enslaved.

Unending Devotion is inspired by one of those women, Jennie King. She rode a train into central Michigan in answer to newspaper ad for a job. She expected to work in a hotel. Instead she found herself enslaved in a brothel. She fled, but was recaptured and beaten. The brave and desperate woman escaped again, wearing only a nightgown, and this time gained help from a local family. The brothel owner tried to get her back again. But the family helped smuggle Jennie out of town and to a safe place.
 
What do you hope readers take away from reading your book Unending Devotion?

Often forgotten in all of the lore and legends is the toll that lumbering took, not only on the land but also on lives. Many lumber barons had the philosophy of getting all they could from the land, as fast as they could, and then letting tomorrow’s people handle tomorrow’s problems. As they moved their camps from place to place, they left behind barren land in their wake, often not even suitable for farming.

Not only did the lumbering industry devastate the land, but it also brought a plethora of moral dilemmas—alcoholism, prostitution, and violence. In fact, the lumber era is credited with introducing white slavery (forced prostitution) into Michigan.

It was my hope in Unending Devotion to bring attention to some of the problems that existed during the lumber era, particularly the issue of white slavery, which is unfortunately still a problem within the United States (and throughout the world) today. I pray that we may we rise up, stand tall, and fight against the injustices that still exist today.

What made you want to write about the topic you did in Unending Devotion?

Unending Devotion is set in Harrison which was a real town in central Michigan that sprang up during the lumber era. In the early 1880’s it had a population of only 2000 people, but had over 20 saloons.

James Carr was a real villain who took up residence in Harrison to prey on the shanty boys of the area. He built a two-story saloon and brothel on a hill overlooking the town and named it the Devil’s Ranch Stockade. Every night between 50 to 250 men visited the Stockade. So many men lost their lives there that eventually the hill outside the Stockade became known as Deadman’s Hill.

When recruitment of prostitutes for his brothel ran low, Carr resorted to procuring women by any means he was able. He kidnapped young women off the streets of Saginaw and Bay City. And he also advertised in down state newspapers for chambermaids and waitresses for his Harrison “hotel.”

When unsuspecting young girls arrived in Harrison by train, Maggie (Carr’s lover and whorehouse matron), would meet the girls at the depot and whisk them off to the brothel. Those who objected were beaten into submission. Most of those girls were never heard from again.

After readers finish this your book what do you want them to remember—walk away feeling? Why is this book/story relevant today?

There are still women (and children) who are being enslaved every day across the world. According to the A21 Campaign (Abolishing Injustice in the 21st Century), human trafficking is the second largest global organized crime today, generating approximately 31.6 billion US dollars each year. Specifically, trafficking for sexual exploitation generates 27.8 billion US dollars per year.

According to A21, the growth of trafficking of women from Eastern and Southern Europe (the former Soviet Bloc) into Western Europe over the past 20 years has been unparalleled anywhere else on the globe.

Sexual slavery is a huge problem on the rise in the Unites States too. A21 states that over 17,500 victims are trafficked in the US annually and approximately 33% are American citizens.
 
What are you working on now? Can you tell us something about it?

My next book, A Noble Groom, releases in April of 2013. It's also set in my home state of Michigan and is centered around a German immigrant farming community. While I haven't based my story on any real characters, I enjoyed bringing to life the Great Fire of 1881 that devastated large parts of central Michigan and killed numerous people.
 
 
Do you have a set size a reading group has to be before you'll talk to them on the phone or in person?

I don't have any special requirements for the size. I've met with both large and small groups and enjoy both!

What do you feel most comfortable doing?

I really like being able to Skype with book groups if possible. I like the ability to "meet" my readers on a more personal level. And I think most groups have appreciated getting to chat with me via the webcam too. But I'm also available to do conference calls as well and like that too!
 
What have you learned about your book and yourself from book club meetings? 

I've learned that I really enjoy chatting with readers, talking about books, and answering questions. It's truly one of the best things about being an author!
 
QUESTIONS I JUST HAD TO ASK
 
1. You are shipwrecked on an uninhabited tropical island with a group of Christians – all friends and relatives of yours. You all have to work as a team to survive. Many roles have to be filled. Which role do you think you’d play?

I'd have to take the role of being the one to find the coffee and coffee maker! ;-) And I'd also have to hunt down the supply of chocolate too!
 
2. You've been given 48 hours to hang out with any two people (alive or dead besides Jesus). Who would you pick and what would you do?

I'd pick my dad for one of the people. He died when I was just 21 and I didn't have the chance to say good-bye. I'd love the opportunity to talk with him one last time.

I'd also choose a popular writing coach to have a mini-writing retreat, to offer me feedback on my writing, and to teach me all the secrets for becoming a better writer.
 
3. What three things would you rather not live without? (Besides friends, family, and my Bible)

That's easy! Chocolate, coffee, and books!
 
4. As a young person, what movie impacted your life, a movie you’ll never forget? If you didn’t watch movies what book affected you most in your youth?

I loved Chariots of Fire. The Olympics are always very inspiring. But to see Eric Liddell work incredibly hard AND stand true to what he believed is even more inspiring.
 
5.  A friend of yours has a time travel machine and will let you have it for awhile. What would you do with it? Where would you go and what would you do?

I would love to travel back in time to each of the settings of my story, to have a firsthand experience of what life was REALLY like during the time periods along with all the sights, sounds, and tastes. And if possible, I'd love to see some of the real characters that I've based some of my stories on.


 
ANY FINAL COMMENTS YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH READERS?
 
I hope to hear from you! I love to connect and you can find me in any one of these places:

My New Writing Buddy
It’s been a pleasure to get to know you and your new book. I just received it yesterday and I’m anxious to start reading it. Love the cover it grabs your attention right away.

I’m THRILLED that Bethany House is giving away 10 copies of your new book Unending Devotion this month @TBCN. Thanks for stopping by.

Blessings to you and your writing Jody!

Sincerely,

Nora :o)
TBCN Where Book Fun Begins!
www.bookfun.org

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE MADE @THE BOOK CLUB NETWORK - CLICK THIS LINK TO ENTER @TBCN 
GIVEAWAY LINK http://www.bookfun.org/group/bethanyhousepublishers/forum/topics/september-2012-featured-author-jody-hedlund-10-book-giveaway

 NOT on this Blog post. Last Day to Enter Drawing is Sept 22nd.

********DISCLAIMER:Entering the give away is considered a confirmation of eligibility on behalf of the enterer in accord with these rules and any pertaining local/federal/international laws. Void where prohibited; odds of winning depend on number of entrants.
This giveaway is an author sponsored event and open to USA & Canada Residents Only!! This giveaway is sponsored by the author and is in no way affiliated with Facebook or Twitter.

Winners will have 2 days to respond to UPDATE YOUR PROFILE at The Book Club Network to include your name and address - If we haven't heard from you about updating your profile. another name will be picked. If your info is all CORRECT - DO NOTHING - YOU ARE ALL SET!
LAST DAY TO ENTER DRAWING SEPT 22nd.

SARAH SUNDIN INTERVIEW & 5 Book GIVEAWAY






ABOUT AUTHOR: Sarah Sundin is the author of A Distant Melody, A Memory Between Us, and Blue Skies Tomorrow. In 2011, A Memory Between Us was a finalist in the Inspirational Reader's Choice Awards, and Sarah received the Writer of the Year Award at the Mount Hermon Christian Writers Conference. A graduate of UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy, she works on-call as a hospital pharmacist. During WWII, her grandfather served as a pharmacist's mate (medic) in the Navy and her great-uncle flew with the US Eighth Air Force in England. Sarah lives in California with her husband and three children.

How did you come up with the idea for With Every Letter, did you base your main character after anyone special?

The idea for With Every Letter occurred to me while watching the classic Jimmy Stewart movie The Shop Around the Corner (which inspired You’ve Got Mail). The anonymous correspondence intrigued me, and I wondered what kind of person would be drawn to anonymity. About that time I was researching Army nursing in World War II for A Memory Between Us and read a lot about the flight nurses. I wanted to write a series about three friends who were flight nurses—and decided to have the first story to include the anonymous correspondence plot.

In your book With Every Letter, did you have an encounter in your research that affected you deeply? Changed the way you thought about things? If so, could you share that with us?

My favorite research treasure trove for With Every Letter was a box from the grandson of a WWII Army engineer based in North Africa. He included copies of his grandfather’s personal narrative, military papers, photographs—and letters to his little girl back home. Those letters touched me deeply, thinking about the father missing his little girl and not watching her grow up, the daughter missing her father and worrying about him, and the mother managing on her own and dealing with her own worries and those of her daughter as well. The letters just brought home, once again, the reality of what the war meant both at home and abroad.

What has surprised you most about being an author?

The first thing that surprised me was that anyone other than my mother actually enjoyed my stories! That still surprises me. The second thing that surprised me was the juggling act. Right now I’m doing publicity for With Every Letter, doing my publisher’s edits for On Distant Shores (Book 2), working on my final outline for Book 3, and pulling together ideas for another series proposal.


What are you working on now?

I received my edits back for On Distant Shores, the second book in the Wings of the Nightingale series, which comes out June 2013. I had so much fun writing this book. It’s about Lt. Georgie Taylor, a flight nurse who’s afraid she’s in over her head and Army pharmacist Sgt. John “Hutch” Hutchinson, whose goals seem frustrated at every turn. Tragedy draws them together, but their differences threaten to keep them apart. Georgie is social and bubbly, and Hutch is quiet and serious—and their banter kept me hopping.

What have been the benefits to you in having relationships with reading groups?

I’ve belonged to a book club since 2004. Through this group I’ve enjoyed some fabulous books and developed some of my closest friendships. So as an author, I like to do anything I can to support reading groups. I love to meet with groups in person, over Skype, or over speaker phone. Of course I benefit in gaining readers who might never have picked up the book, but more importantly, my greatest joy is watching a novel help friendships grow.

Do you have a set size a reading group has to be before you'll talk to them on the phone or in person? What do you feel most comfortable doing?

I don’t have a limit. I’ve enjoyed speaking to small groups and larger groups.

Have you been surprised by readers’ reactions to one of your books, to one of your characters? If so, which ones or what surprised you?
My book club, the Bibliovores, minus me (I'm taking the photo) and our Skype visit with author Carla Stewart.

Good surprises. A few weeks ago, I met with a local book club that had read my third novel, Blue Skies Tomorrow. They were a wonderfully chatty group, and I had so much fun seeing what they picked up out of the book. One lady solved the “mystery” of Helen’s past on the first page (wow), others didn’t figure it out until the big reveal at the one-quarter point of the book, and others slowly picked up on clues I’d planted. I saw they disliked characters they were supposed to dislike, and liked characters they were supposed to like. They asked fabulous, intelligent, well-informed questions. It was so much fun. And they served pie.

Has your book club experience - getting feed back from reading groups - helped you in writing future books? If so, how has it helped you?
At my launch party for Blue Skies Tomorrow, with author Keli Gwyn, my agent Rachel Kent, me, and author Michelle Ule.

I think so. Actually listening to my own book club analyze novels is a fascinating experience for me as an author. What resonates with readers? What types of characters and set-ups and plots do they like? What issues do they care about? And what doesn’t work? The ten of us are close friends with so much in common, but often half of us love a book and the other half hates it. This helps me when I read reviews of my own novels. When someone dislikes my book, I don’t take it personally, since I know how tastes vary.


QUESTIONS I JUST HAD TO ASK

You are shipwrecked on an uninhabited tropical island with a group of Christians – all friends and relatives of yours. You all have to work as a team to survive. Many roles have to be filled. Which role do you think you’d play?

I would not be the leader, guaranteed. But I’m a hard worker and would do whatever had to be done. And I was a Girl Scout, so I wouldn’t be totally useless ☺

You've been given 48 hours to hang out with any person (alive or dead besides Jesus). Who would you pick and what would you do?

I’d pick my grandfathers. My mother’s father died when she was in high school, so I never got to meet him. And my father’s father died in 1992, long before I started writing. He loved to tell stories about his World War II experiences, and I listened, but I didn’t LISTEN, and I didn’t ask questions.

What three things would you rather not live without? (Besides friends and family)
Caffeine, books, and air conditioning.

As a young person, what movie impacted your life, a movie you’ll never forget? If you didn’t watch movies what book affected you most in your youth?

I did watch movies, but books affected me more. I think the books that impacted me most were Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books. My sister and I almost wore out our copies, we read them so much. They affected me because I was able to put myself in Laura’s high-button shoes and imagine what it was like to live in a very different time. They gave me a great appreciation for the past and a love for history that I certainly didn’t gain in school history classes.

A friend of yours has a time travel machine and will let you have it for awhile. What would you do with it? Where would you go and what would you do?

No real mystery here. I’d go back to the 1940s and do the best kind of research ever! Can you imagine being able to talk to people back then and find out how they really felt, unfiltered by seventy years of hindsight?

ANY FINAL COMMENTS YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH READERS?
Book signing at the Lifeway store in Brea CA, with my sister, Martha Groeber on the left, and childhood friend Kirsten Sanchez in the middle.
I love to talk with readers. They can find me on they can find me on the web at
http://www.sarahsundin.com, Facebook and twitter.

Sarah
Thanks Sarah for stopping by and giving us a peek into your new book, you and your book club memories. I really enjoyed With Every Letter. I could really relate to your mail character Mellie. I specially enjoy how you wrapped this special story in the 1940’s war setting. I learned so much.

I’m thrilled that Revell is giving away 5 copies of your book. I’m also thrilled to be featuring you at The Book Club Network this month. This new series sounds really good. I can’t wait for your next book to come out. Praying the Lord touches your writing and spirit as you write this series.

You’re a Blessing

Nora :o)
TBCN Where Book Fun Begins!

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE MADE @THE BOOK CLUB NETWORK - CLICK THIS LINK TO ENTER @TBCN 
GIVEAWAY LINK

NOT on this Blog post. Last Day to Enter Drawing is Sept 22nd.

********DISCLAIMER:Entering the give away is considered a confirmation of eligibility on behalf of the enterer in accord with these rules and any pertaining local/federal/international laws. Void where prohibited; odds of winning depend on number of entrants.
This giveaway is an author sponsored event and open to USA and Canada Residents Only!! This giveaway is sponsored by the author and is in no way affiliated with Facebook or Twitter.

Winners will have 2 days to respond to UPDATE YOUR PROFILE at The Book Club Network to include your name and address - If we haven't heard from you about updating your profile. another name will be picked. If your info is all CORRECT - DO NOTHING - YOU ARE ALL SET!
LAST DAY TO ENTER DRAWING SEPT 22nd.

DAN WALSH INTERVIEW & 5 BOOK GIVEAWAY


ABOUT AUTHOR: DAN WALSH
I was born in Philadelphia in 1957 (guys don't care if you know) to a mostly blue-collar, hard-working Irish family. My Dad was the first person on either side of the family to earn a college degree. It took him nine years, working during the day, going to college at night, using the GI Bill from his war days in Korea. In the mid-sixties, General Electric hired him as an engineer for the Apollo space program. We packed up and moved to Florida, which is really where I grew up.

I spent my childhood years playing basketball and surfing. In the spring of my senior year in high school I met the woman who would become my wife, Cindi. We dated for a brief period. I asked her to marry me and, to my great surprise, she said yes. We were married near the end of 1976. We have two children, now grown.

The desire to write novels first began in high school. But I didn't have the time to pursue this passion until 2007. To find out more, visit my website at www.danwalshbooks.com

How did you come up with the idea for The Reunion, did you base your main character after anyone special?

 While researching an earlier novel set during World War II (The Homecoming), I came across an amazing story about a young man who had done some extraordinary, heroic things in battle; saving countless lives and almost losing his own. He received the Congressional Medal Of Honor, then went home after the war and lived in virtual obscurity, working as a janitor in an Air Force Academy. Decades later, one of the cadets was reading an account of World War II heroes and recognized the name of this same janitor he and his fellow cadets walked by everyday and never paid attention to. At the next graduation, the entire school honored this man for all he had done so many years before. Of course, life changed dramatically for this forgotten war hero after that.

I was deeply moved by your book The Reunion, did you have an encounter in your research that affected you deeply? Changed the way you thought about things?

Yes, I did. I had never spent any time researching the Vietnam War. And I was surprised to learn how different this war was from all the others, particularly for the average soldier. Even in WW2, a soldier might only experience 2-3 months of battle spread out over a year. In Vietnam, they lived in mortal danger every single day for a year. In this war, the enemy (the people trying to kill you) weren't men wearing uniforms. Often, they were civilians, even women and children. In other wars, the soldiers knew America was totally behind them. With Vietnam, they knew the country had turned against the war. And most of these young men were drafted, forced into service. So they were stuck, experiencing all these horrors, doing what their country had asked of them, only to return home to experience derision and scorn. I had a totally different outlook about Vietnam veterans as a result of learning these things.

What was your favorite scene to write in The Reunion? What was your hardest?

My favorite scene to write was also the hardest. It was the climactic reunion scene, which lasted for several chapters at the end. For the most part, it's an incredibly happy scene. But it's so filled with so much emotion, experienced by so many of the characters. At times, I had to stop writing and give myself a break. I was so emotionally invested in these characters that I felt everything they were going through as if it was happening to me. I cried many times, not just when I first wrote it, but through every edit as well.

After readers finish this your book what do you want them to remember—walk away feeling?

Besides experiencing a fresh appreciation and sense of honor for those who serve in our nation's military, maybe it's this. At the beginning of the book I quoted something Jesus said in Luke 13. He was talking about Judgment Day: “…Some who seem least important now will be the greatest then, and some who seem the greatest now will be least important then.” In one sense, I hope The Reunion stirs people's hearts to see others the way God sees them, because the way we measure each other's worth and value is radically different from God's perspective.

Jesus routinely stopped to take an interest in ordinary people. A woman at a well, a blind beggar, a nameless leper. I hope my readers will be thoroughly entertained as they read this book but, also, I hope it opens their eyes a bit to see people with more concern and compassion, the way Jesus did.

Which type of book club meeting do you prefer? Why?

I love visiting book clubs in person, although I know this is not practical most of the time. But when I get to, I always have the most wonderful time. I love interacting with people anyway, but in person I get to see their faces as we discuss the book. Often, I will meet a book club via speaker phone, which works pretty well. I usually ask the moderator to have members think of questions they'd like to ask in advance, and we’ll talk for 30-40 minutes. I haven't met with any groups using video yet, but I think that could work well also.

What was your most memorable reading group experience? What made it so special?

 I was meeting with a group near Melbourne, Florida, discussing my novel, The Deepest Waters. One of the main characters in this book is an old, illiterate Negro slave named Micah (he's my favorite character in the book). I worked very hard at capturing this man's heart, mind and even the way he talked. But let's face it, I'm a white guy who grew up in the suburbs with a mostly Leave It to Beaver childhood. One of the group members was a middle-aged African American woman. She absolutely loved the book, and especially Micah. She said I had nailed this character completely, and every time she read a scene with him it reminded her of listening to her great-grandfather when she was a child, who was a former slave.

Can you give us a peek into what you are working on right now and when it will be out?

I just finished my second novel with co-author Gary Smalley. It won't release until this time next year. But the first book in our 4-book series, The Dance, will be out this coming April. Fans of Karen Kingsbury might remember the Redemption series she wrote with Gary several years ago. Gary says he can already tell these books will impact people much the same way. It's been a joy to work with him. I've loved every minute of it. Here's a link for a sneak peek at The Dance: http://danwalshbooks.com/books/books-with-gary-smalley

 What about you do you think would surprise readers?

Here's something… I was a surfer throughout high school and didn't get a haircut for almost 4 years. Here’s something more recent… I love listening to and singing the old love song standards of the 40s, 50s and 60s. And if there was an American Idol for old geezers, I might even make it through the first few rounds.

QUESTIONS I JUST HAD TO ASK
 
        You are shipwrecked on an uninhabited tropical island with a group of Christians   – all friends and relatives of yours. You all have to work as a team to survive. Many roles have to be filled. Which role do you think you’d play?

It would definitely not be the cook, but after being a pastor for 25 years I'm a pretty good organizer. I could probably do a good job at getting everyone to work together to set up camp.

          You've been given 48 hours to hang out with any two people (alive or dead). Who would you pick and what would you do?

The apostle Paul – I’d ask him 100 questions about life in the early church and about his experiences. And maybe Charles Dickens. I think it would be fascinating to interview him as a writer.

           What three things would you rather not live without? (Besides friends and family)

 My dogs, my laptop and great books to read.

            As a young person, what movie impacted your life, a movie you’ll never forget? If you didn’t watch movies what book affected you most in your youth?

That's a hard one, so many come to mind. Probably, It's a Wonderful Life. It's my all-time favorite movie, and it's hard to forget because I've watched it every year since.


            Name three books you adored as a child?

I actually didn't read that many books as a child. I played outside a lot and was into sports. I do remember reading and enjoying Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.

If you could be a super hero for a day, who would you pick and why? (you can mix and match powers if you’d like, your an author you can be creative! Grin!)

I'm sorry for not picking someone more creative, but I think it would have to be Superman. To me, he's got the whole package. I'd especially like to be able to fly.

A friend of yours has a time travel machine and will let you have it for awhile. What would you do with it? Where would you go and what would you do?

Hands down, I would travel back to the World War II era. I’d particularly like to see places like New York City and London during those years.

ANY FINAL COMMENTS YOU WANT TO SHARE WITH READERS?

Just to add my thanks for taking this time with me here. Oh, and also talk me up to your book club and get one of my books on your schedule. I'd love to meet with your group soon for a chat.

Thanks Dan for stopping by and giving us a peek into your new book, you and your book club memories. Oh, I’ve already told my ladies and everyone at the book store about your new book. I really enjoyed reading The Reunion; I’ve put it on the voting list for Finding Hope Book Club later on this year. It’s my favorite book you’ve written so far. It touched my heart deeply.

Thanks Nora, for all you do to serve so many believers. I don't know how you manage it all.

Dan  

Blessings to you and your writing. I'm looking forward to reading your next book.
 
Nora St.Laurent
The Book Club Network
www.bookfun.org

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE MADE @THE BOOK CLUB NETWORK - CLICK THIS LINK TO ENTER @TBCN http://www.bookfun.org/group/revell-books/forum/topics/september-2012-featured-author-dan-walsh-the-reunion-5-book-givea

www.bookfun.org NOT on this Blog post. Last Day to Enter Drawing is Sept 22nd.

********DISCLAIMER:Entering the give away is considered a confirmation of eligibility on behalf of the enterer in accord with these rules and any pertaining local/federal/international laws. Void where prohibited; odds of winning depend on number of entrants.
This giveaway is an author sponsored event and open to USA and  Canada Residents Only!! This giveaway is sponsored by the author and is in no way affiliated with Facebook or Twitter.

Winners will have 2 days to respond to UPDATE YOUR PROFILE at The Book Club Network to include your name and address - If we haven't heard from you about updating your profile. another name will be picked. If your info is all CORRECT - DO NOTHING - YOU ARE ALL SET!
LAST DAY TO ENTER DRAWING SEPT 22nd.