BOOK FUN MAGAZINE - FREE READ

CATHY GOHLKE INTERVIEW & GIVEAWAY OPPORTUNITY




ABOUT AUTHOR: Cathy Gohlke is the three-time Christy Award-winning author of the critically acclaimed novels Secrets She Kept (winner of the 2016 Carol and INSPY Awards), Saving Amelie (winner of the 2015 INSPY Award), Band of Sisters, Promise Me This (listed by Library Journal as one of the best books of 2012), William Henry Is a Fine Name, and I Have Seen Him in the Watchfires (listed by Library Journal as one of the best books of 2008), which also won the American Christian Fiction Writers' Book of the Year Award. 

Cathy has worked as a school librarian, drama director, and director of children's and education ministries. When not traipsing the hills and dales of historic sites, she, her husband, and their dog, Reilly, divide their time between Northern Virginia and the Jersey Shore, enjoying time with their children and granddaughters. Visit her website at www.cathygohlke.com and on Facebook at CathyGohlkeBooks

How did you come up with the idea for Until We Find Home?
CATHY: Alarmed by the plight of young refugees fleeing gangs in Mexico to cross the United States border, and heart heavy for victims and refugees worldwide who’ve suffered and continue to suffer under oppressive regimes, I looked for a moment in history to tell their tale as I wish it could play out. I didn’t have to look far.

The Kindertransport of 1938–1940 brought 10,000 predominantly Jewish children to Great Britain for refuge from Nazi oppression. 
Some of those were housed in the beautiful Lake District. When dear friend and author Carrie Turansky and I combined forces to research our separate books in England, then joined a wonderful tour led by Liz Curtis Higgs through Scotland, I had the opportunity to visit the area. Both countries provided great grist for the writing mill.

Accounts abound of men and women who rescued children through resistance in occupied countries during WWII, often at great cost—even life itself. 

But what happened next? What happened when those children entered countries of refuge? I wondered about the average person and what role they might have played once the children were out of immediate danger . . . and what role we might play in the world’s need today. Until We Find Home explores these questions on the British home front.

Nora: I was fascinated by this situation and how it came about. The answers to the above questions was unimaginable and thought-provoking. I couldn’t put this novel down.

Can you tell me of two “wow” moments you’ve had in your writing career? What made it a wow for you?

CATHY: Wow #1: The first time I was called to the stage to accept a Christy Award. The “wow” wasn’t because of receiving the physical award (though that was exciting and wonderful) but because it came to me as affirmation from the Lord that, despite the many naysayers in my life and all the reasons I should have failed, this writing for His glory was the path He’d chosen for me during the second half of my life’s journey. That insight—like a sweet and precious kiss from the Lord—was a mountaintop experience and a turning point for me.

Wow #2: At one of the lowest points of my chemotherapy treatments, I was tempted to give up. While weak and bedridden from a dangerously low white blood count, I read a story of John Sherrill’s two-time battle with cancer. According to the account I read, John, though believing in God, had not yet accepted Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior. On his way to a second surgery, with a prognosis of only three months to live, he surrendered his life to Christ. When the doctors operated to cut out the mass of suspected cancer, it had shrunk to the size of a raisin and was not cancerous. John considered his healing miraculous. 

For me, there was another miracle. I knew John and Elizabeth Sherrill as the as-told-to cowriters of Corrie ten Boom’s The Hiding Place. I realized that if John had given up—if he’d allowed cancer to overwhelm him and steal his life, if he’d never surrendered his life to Christ and been healed to go from strength to strength—he and his wife would not have gone on to write the book that has brought hope to and strengthened the faith of millions. He would not have written the book that so convicted me as a young woman or that inspired Billy Graham to produce the movie by the same name—or that provided the answer to Hannah’s desperate need to forgive in my book Secrets She Kept.

Reading Sherrill’s story of full surrender to the Lord and of overcoming fear and cancer at the low time I did in my own cancer journey gave me great hope that if I waited upon the Lord, He might again use me to write stories of hope and faith and conviction too—stories that glorify Him and portray His love for us all. 

Sherrill’s unique connection to Corrie ten Boom and her connection to the characters of Secrets She Kept—which was about to release—washed over me as another great love gift, a reminder that all my days and all my abilities and opportunities are in God’s hands, that He is not limited by diagnoses or human catastrophes. That morning, I learned to fight with a surrendered heart and knew I would write again, one way or another. I can’t wait to meet John in heaven and thank him.

Nora: Wow, that is powerful. I liked how you brought that aspect of fighting and purpose out through your character Miranda who struggled with the diagnosis of cancer. “As Miranda’s health worsened, she prepared for the end of this life and even prayed that the Lord would allow her to die with grace and dignity.” I appreciate your transparency about this matter in your author notes to readers.

Can you give us a sneak peek into what you are working on now? When will it be out?

CATHY: I’m working on a new WWII book, set primarily in Poland and ending in England. Poland suffered from every side during the war—invaded by the Germans and the Russians, and in the end, it was hung out to dry even by the British and Americans. This is a story of jumping in to help when needed, of standing up to do what you can, what you must, no matter the cost. And in the end, when you think you’ve given everything, what do you do when you’re asked to give up what—or whom—you love most?

Irena Sendler, the Polish social worker who created a network that saved 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw ghetto, is a cameo character. What happened to those rescued children after the war? It’s a story I’ve felt compelled to write. It is set to release in 2019.

Nora: Wow, this sounds like another fascinating novel. I love that your books have me learn about history through your characters and their unique situations and showing God’s intervention. Thank you for writing them.

Out of all the sounds in the world, which are your favorite?
CATHY: Birdsong in the morning; bells at Evensong; someone singing for the joy of it.

Nora: Love it!

What movie affected you most when you were young? If you didn’t watch movies, what books affected you most? 

CATHY: Little Women by Louisa May Alcott; The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain; Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery; The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett; A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson; In His Steps by Charles Sheldon; The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom, as told to John and Elizabeth Sherrill; and Christy by Catherine Marshall.

Nora: Wow, that’s quite a list!

What keeps you sane in the middle of craziness? Hope in the middle of stress and life’s storms?

CATHY: I remember that I have a long history with the God I worship, the Father I trust. My life, like others, has held many storms—storms that would have been my undoing except for Him. I trust Him because He’s always been faithful, always kept His promises. He had hope, and a future planned for me when I had none. In this life I have Christ; in death I have Him more. There is no “lose” in that, but surrender and joyful abandon.

Nora: Amen! Amen!

A friend of yours has a time machine and they will let you use it for a while. Where would you go and what would you do?

CATHY: I’d go to Israel in the time of Jesus. I’d love to look into His eyes, hear Him speak to individuals—maybe even to me—feel the touch of His hand, hear Him preach, watch as He healed people, and see His ministry unfold. I’d love to watch as He upended all the prevailing ideas of the day among religious leaders and led them to grapple with understanding just what He meant. I’d love to perceive Him through the eyes of a woman of that time.

In fact, I’m hoping to do the next best thing. In 2020, a dear friend, author, and veteran traveler to Israel, Terri Gillespie, will join me in leading a tour through Israel, culminating with the Passion Play in Oberammergau, Germany (where my book Saving Amelie is set during WWII). We’ll explore Jesus’ calling of disciples in His day in Israel, what it looked like to walk as His disciple through WWII in Germany, and what it means to walk as His disciples today. We’d love to have you join us! Check my website, www.cathygohlke.com, and my Facebook page, CathyGohlkeBooks, in the spring of 2018 for trip details.

Nora: Wow, Cathy. I’m excited for your trip in 2020. Look forward to seeing your pictures.

CATHY GOHLKE, ANY FINAL COMMENTS FOR READERS? 
CATHY: Thank you for having me, Nora! I’ve loved sharing this time—and these memories and future dreams—with you and all your readers.
    
    
Come visit me on Facebook at CathyGohlkeBooks or stop by my website, where you’ll find more research photos and recipes from Until We Find Home. If your book club would like to host a FaceTime or telephone meeting with me after reading Until We Find Home, let me know. I’d love to share that experience.

Nora: Thank you for stopping by and sharing the behind the scenes of your happenings of your new book Until We Find Home. Thank you for all the wonderful pictures too.


PLEASE ANSWER ONE 

of the Following Questions to be Entered into the drawing for chance at a copy of this book.



1. If you've read any books by this author which ones? What was your favorite? Why?

2. Have any of you read about this time period and the children fleeing their homes? If so what did you learn that surprised you?

3. What surprised you and/or you learned about this time period that you hadn't known before.

CONGRATS to DEANNA DICK 
Your name was drawn
Your information was sent to the publisher.

THANKS to everyone for stopping by and answering the questions.

PLEASE Remember to include your email address so I can contact you if your name is drawn! THANKS!

I’m looking forward to reading your new book that takes place in Poland. Cathy is a featured author in Book Fun Magazine. She shares more pictures and tidbits about this book! www.bookfun.org Click on front cover on front page to read current magazine issue!

Blessings to you and yours
Nora :o)

Nora St. Laurent The Book Club Network Inc. http://www.bookfun.org
You can read author interviews, reviews, learn about book signings and about TBCN giveaways on the blog she created called The Book Club Network blog, http://www.psalm516.blogspot.com
Nora also does author interviews and reviews for Book Fun Magazine http://www.bookfunmagazine.com  

Nora has also run book clubs face to face and online with more than 100 members. She enjoys working part-time for the Public Library as a CSA.

69 comments:

  1. Since I research the WWII era all the time, I'm always amazed at how much MORE there is to learn. What I learned here is more about Cathy's love for this time period. And I have to say, I am so thankful you're writing that book about the suffering in Poland--betrayed and maligned, those hearty folks still gave the Allied cause their all. Their story needs to be told and retold. What a people! Thank you for being here today, Cathy.

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    1. Gail, I so agree--their story needs to be told. Poland suffered in so many unique ways and their military--driven from Poland--fought valiantly for the Allies from other countries.
      Thank you for the warm welcome!

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  2. Thank you for stopping by Gail. The story about Poland sounds like another fascinating heart-felt story! Looking forward to reading that one Cathy! Thanks for your wonderful pictures you shared here and in the Book Fun Magazine interview!

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    1. It has been my delight and pleasure to spend this time together, Nora. Thank you for having me!

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  3. I have read Secrets She Kept. It was very interesting. Since it's the only one I've read by this author I guess it would be my favorite and also the reason it's my favorite. I would love to have a chance to read and review Until We Find Home. tulip_five@yahoo.com

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    1. Victoria, I'm delighted you enjoy Secrets She Kept. I hope you will enjoy Until We Find Home. The two books are quite different in addition to being set in different countries.

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  4. I love reading this time period. It always intrigued me find out how hard it was for children during this time period. I love to read historical facts and in Secrets She Kept I was glued to the story. I would like the chance to read your new book.
    jhdwayne@peopleoc.com

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    1. Deana, I'm so glad you enjoyed Secrets She Kept. I loved writing that book, especially the connections to Corrie ten Boom. I hope you enjoy Until We Find Home just as much. The two books are quite different. I especially loved writing the viewpoints of children in this one. Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  5. I loved this book. I just finished last week. I loved reading about these poor children.

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    1. Virginia, I'm so glad you enjoyed Until We Find Home. The plight of refugee children is truly heart wrenching.

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  6. I have read several books set in this time period--Corrie Ten Boom's books, Ann Frank, etc. I do love to read about the people who assisted those in jeopardy. I would love to read/review your book. Thanks. jacquir613@gmail.com

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  7. My first ever Cathy Gohlke read...and my favorite so far...was Promise Me This.

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    1. Linda, that's so encouraging. A number of readers have voted Promise Me This their favorite. God bless!

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  8. I have not yet read any of Cathy's books but plan to change that after reading this interview. I read The Hiding Place as a teenager - first book I stayed up all night reading. It was that good. I am fascinated by this historical time period. Thanks for the chance to win a book. E-mail address is boxtopscrazy(at)gmail(dot)com.

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    1. I LOVED The Hiding Place, too. Corrie ten Boom's story made such an impact on my life--one I'm still walking out today.

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  9. I have not yet read any of Cathy's books but plan to change that after reading this interview. I read The Hiding Place as a teenager - first book I stayed up all night reading. It was that good. I am fascinated by this historical time period. Thanks for the chance to win a book. E-mail address is boxtopscrazy(at)gmail(dot)com.

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  10. I've read all of Cathy's books and loved them. My favorite is Saving Amelie because it features a deaf child and the struggle to keep her alive. I'd love to win her latest book. susanjreinhardt AT gmail DOT com

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    1. Susan, it's wonderful to see you here--you wonderful writer, you! The tour that Terri Gillespie and I will lead through Israel to Oberammergau's Passion Play in 2020 is called The Saving Amelie Tour. It would be so wonderful if you could join us!

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  11. It is devastating that so many children had to flee their home, and fight for their lives. I learned that love and family are important.

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    1. Yes, vicjbr, it was devastating for those children. Most of them never saw their parents again. Love and family, even when we embrace others to become part of our family, is truly important. Thank you for stopping by!

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  12. I posted a comment earlier, but for some reason it is not showing here. I like to read books in this time period and have read Corrie Ten Boom's and Anne Frank's books and others. I would like to read/review this book. Thanks. jacquir613@gmail.com

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    1. Thank you, Jacqui, for sharing those good books here. It's such a gift to have first hand accounts from those who lived through those years. God bless!

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  13. Secrets She Kept was a really interesting book that I read. I would like to read and review this book for you.

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    1. Thank you, Karen. I'm so glad you enjoyed Secrets She Kept. Since Until We Find Home takes place in England, it's a very different war time experience from those who lived in Germany. I hope you enjoy it.

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  14. Thank you for this wonderful interview. I wasn't familiar with KinderTransport and I'm sure that this book is a very worthwhile read. Thank you for your giveaway.
    Blessings!
    Connie
    cps1950(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Connie, I give England much credit for taking in children when so many other countries refused refugees. It was a horrible, heart wrenching decision for parents to make, but they sent their children out of love for them. I hope you enjoy the story.

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  15. I've read Secrets She Kept and LOVED it! Such an emotional impact...not a 'happy forever after' type book but a thought-provoking, soul-searching book that is rich and complex in its message. Looking forward to reading this newest one!

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    1. Anne, I'm so glad you enjoyed Secrets She Kept! Until We Find Home is very different, especially because it takes place in a country that was not occupied, but greatly feared invasion. I loved writing both stories. I hope you enjoy it!

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  16. I've read Secrets She Kept, and it was amazing. I can't wait to read this one!

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    1. Kate, I so hope you enjoy Until We Find Home! This is a book that holds so much of my own life journey--it's dear to my heart. God bless!

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  17. I have several of Cathy's books on my GoodReads' TBR list. I enjoy WWII era books and will look forward to reading Secret's She Kept. Discovering history through fiction fascinates me. Thank you for your research and listening to God's calling on your life!

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    1. Sharon, thank you for your encouragement. There are so many stories to tell from WWII--an endless supply. It's truly a privilege to write the ones God places on my heart.

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  18. This really is a fascinating and powerful post! I didn't know anything about Irena Sendler, "the Polish social worker who created a network that saved 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw ghetto". Wow! It's too bad that we don't know more about some of these fascinating heroes! I haven't yet read any of Cathy's books. Becky lelandandbecky (at) reagan (dot) com

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    1. Becky, I agree that it's important to know more about fascinating heroes. That's why I try to include some real people from history in my books, or books that have influenced and blessed me. I don't want those wonderful influences to be forgotten. I hope you enjoy Until We Find Home.

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  19. I have Promise Me This awaiting me on my Kindle. I've read all of her other books except this newest one. I enjoyed them all. Band of Sisters was the first one I read and it greatly impressed me so I knew I'd have to read her other books. Thanks for this interview with Cathy and the book giveaway.
    pmkellogg56[at]gmail[dot]com

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    1. Pam, thanks so much for stopping by. I'm delighted you've read so many of my books, and hope you enjoy Until We Find Home. It's quite different from the others, but was a very personal and special book to write.

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  20. I have read Secrets she kept and was amazingly blown away by that book. It was a 5 star read for me and I don't hand out 5 star ratings loosely. I'm so excited to read this new one Until we find home and will have kleenex nearby when I do, because I'm sure I will need them! :)

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    1. Cheryl, I'm so glad you enjoy Secrets She Kept. That was a heart wrenching novel to research and write. Until We Find Home is very different. There is such a difference between countries that were perpetrators during the war, countries that were occupied, and countries that feared invasion. This will seem tamer in that way since England wasn't occupied, but I hope it will resonate with you as well. God bless!

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  21. Oops forgot to add my email address- ihhcheryl@gmail.com

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  22. I enjoyed the interview! I love WWII era stories. I've only read Cathy's Saving Amelie. I look forward to reading more of her books.

    psalm103and138atgmaildotcom

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    1. Caryl, I hope you enjoy Until We Find Home!

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  23. I've read many books set in this time period but I don't think I've read one specifically about rescuing the children. "Man's inhumanity to man" never ceases to surprise me, and not in a good way. I think the reason I love reading books set in this time period is because it inspires me to do what I can, even if it's not much, to make life easier for someone else. Stepping out in faith is hard when everyone around you is cowering from the world's evil. After reading your interview, Nora, I'm pretty sure I need to add some Cathy Gohlke to my TBR list!
    pgraber60@gmail.com

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    1. Pam, your response to books of this era is exactly what I hope readers will see, feel, step out in faith to accomplish. Your insights are very encouraging! God bless!

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  24. Stories during WWII are so interesting to me. I've read several fiction books with real history background. My father in law served in WWII with the US Navy. He told of some of his experiences piloting a Uboat.
    Gail Hollingsworth
    tumcsec(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Gail, it's wonderful that your father-in-law told some of his experiences piloting a U-boat. Hearing those firsthand accounts means a great deal. I truly appreciate when survivors and veterans share their stories.

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  25. Secrets She Kept is the only one I have read so far by Ms. Gohlke and it was moving and powerful! I love reading about this time period so look forward to reading this one, too! Danandlyndaedwards (at) msn (dot) com.

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    1. Lynda, I hope you enjoy Until We Find Home. I'm so glad you enjoyed Secrets She Kept!

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  26. I’ve read about children being smuggled out during WEII but don’t know a whole lot about it. Didn’t realize such a great number were taken to Great Britain. This will be a great read.
    mindyhoungATmsnDOTcom

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  27. Not sure if my last comment got posted.....but would love to read more about the children who were transported to Great Britain during WWII. I didn’t know there were so many.
    mindyhoung AT msn DOT com

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  28. I've always been interested in WWII. My father was an 18 yr. old who served in the infantry under General Patton. He would never talk about it so I love reading about that era. My Dad was stationed in Post WWII Germany in the mid 1950's and I saw the bombed out churches, the German law would not allow them to be torn down. I saw the struggles the people were going through and as I grew up I learned to love that time in history. I read a lot of books about that time. You are an author I've never read.

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  29. 2. I have read other books set during that time period and am amazed at the courage of both the children and their families. I can not imagine! You would have to trust God. jarning67(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  30. I have read so many books set in the WWII time period, but each time I read another one, I am amazed at the little bit I do know. Last year I finished reading Michael Phillips' series, The Secret of the Rose. Extraordinary! I'm looking forward to reading Cathy's novel.

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  31. I have read two books by Cathy so far - Saving Amelie and Secrets She Kept. I gave them both 5 stars, but Secrets She Kept is my favorite. I'm looking forward to her newest, and I'm also eager to read her previously published books!

    Beth
    bharbin07(at)gmail(dot)com

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  32. I have heard of Cathy’s books but haven’t read any yet. WWII is one of my favorite eras to read about. I just finished two: Melody of the Soul by Liz Tolsma and A Song Unheard by Roseanna White. Both were about violinists during the war but completely different . Roseanna ‘s was about WWI actually. They were wonderful each in its own way. I think we all need to read about these situations and keep history alive. Stories about children are especially important. Thanks for the review and interview. paulams49ATsbcglobalDOTnet

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  33. I haven't read any books by this author but they sure sound interesting. I would love to read one someday. lisaboesehaems(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  34. I have not read any by Cathy yet but this one looks especially good.
    I have read a story about kids being sent to the country during the war! Ever heard of The Lion, the Witch , and the Wardrobe? LOL! paulams49ATsbcglobalDOTnet

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  35. Oops I hadn’t realized I’d commented before I accessed from another site!

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  36. I think it is fascinating how Cathy has taken a modern plight and connected it so well with historical accounts of similar plight. This gives us hope that current refugees and those fleeing from oppressive regimes and war can find safe passage and hope for new life.

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  37. I've read several books that include the flight of children suffering during WWI and WWII. I'm constantly learning from these time periods, and am so inspired by the resiliency of the human soul.

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  38. Secrets She Kept is an amazing book. I thought it was intensely emotional and that Cathy had an excellent grasp on the history of that era. It's a thought-provoking, soul-searching book that is rich and complex in its message. And I loved the cameo appearance of the Dutch Sisters! I am so looking forward to this new one of Cathy's. Thank you for sharing about it.
    anne@rightler.com

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  39. My favorite book is Band of Sisters. I love to read about that time period. And I love, love the relationships that the women built and their strength of character.

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  40. I have not read any of your books as of today. They are on my TBR list. One of the things that stands out in WWII is how many woman wanted to help and not just at home but on the frontline. Of course as a black person it is always hard to see how African Americans soldiers were treated.

    sonnetta_jones@hotmail.com

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  41. The whole idea of the Flight of Children surprises me. While this era is fascinating, it's also hard to read about. My heart breaks for those children. I guess I cant really fathom what it would be like to have to give up your children due to a war, but we would all do whatever it takes to ensure our children's welfare. Oh, those poor mamas and daddys.
    ksucindy@excite.com

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  42. It's been awhile ago, I read, "Band of Sisters", which I enjoyed. Were there any additional books that followed this story?

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  43. I like to read stories of this time. My parents lived through it. I'm glad their German ancestos had moved to America in the 1800s. I have heard of smuggling out children in various ways. I admire those who helped.

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  44. I haven't read any of Cathy's books yet, but several are on my TBR list. I had not heard of the Kindertransport of 1938–1940. How wonderful that they were able to save that many children! Remarkable!! I would love to read more this. I have been intrigued with Cathy's newest book, Until We Find Home, since I first heard about it, and can't wait to read it! Thanks for the GREAT interview and the opportunity of this giveaway!! ~Alison Boss

    nj(dot)bossman(at)gmail(dot)com

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  45. I follow Cathy on GoodReads and have marked six or more of her books on my to be read list. I am fascinated with WWII historical novels and think Until We Find Home would be a favorite. Thank you for this giveaway opportunity! May God richly bless you and keep you healthy to continue living and writing for Him.
    Sharon Paavola

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  46. I have read all of Cathy's books thus far, except for her most recent one. My favourite was Saving Amelie.

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  47. THANKS to everyone for stopping by. I love your comments. Thank you Cathy for being here too. Your book was eye opening to say the least. I had never read a book about what happened to the children that were sent away hoping to reconnect with their families later. WOW, a powerful and memorable read. CONGRATS to DEANA DICK your name was drawn to receive a copy of Until We Find Home. If you haven't read this book I highly recommend it.

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